Pôle Alpin Risques Naturels (PARN) Alpes–Climat–Risques Avec le soutien de la Région Rhône-Alpes (2007-2014)
FR
EN
 


Fiche bibliographique

 

Réf. Wastl et al. 2012 - A

Référence bibliographique
WASTL C., SCHUNK C., LEUCHNER M., PEZZATTI G.B., MENZEL A., 2012. Recent climate change: long-term trends in meteorological forest fire danger in the Alps. Agric. Forest Meteorol. 162–163, 1–13.

Abstract : Climate change is one of the key issues in current scientific research. In this paper we investigate the impacts of rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns on meteorological forest fire danger in the Alps. Our analysis is based on daily meteorological observations from 25 long-term stations in six Alpine countries. The selected stations are distributed more or less uniformly over the whole Alpine area and represent the different climate regions in this complex terrain. Stations with similar climatological conditions were grouped into regions. These were: Western Alps, Northern Alps, inner Alpine area and Southern Alps. The meteorological forest fire danger in the time period 1951–2010 was assessed on the basis of different forest fire danger indices (FWI, Nesterov, Baumgartner, etc.) calculated on a daily basis. A statistical percentile analysis revealed different impacts of recent climate change in the four regions. A significant increase in forest fire danger occurred at the stations in the Western Alps and even more strongly in the Southern Alps. Here, the yearly averaged fire danger increased during the past six decades. Additionally, in recent years the number of days with elevated forest fire danger (indices above a predefined threshold) has also increased. A comparatively weak increase was observed in the Northern Alps and no clear signal was evident at the stations in the inner Alpine valleys. In order to analyze extreme events (highest index value per year and region) extreme values statistics was applied. It was shown that the return period of extraordinarily high index values has decreased significantly over the past decades, especially in the Western and Southern Alps. For three pilot areas (Valais in the Western Alps, Bavaria in the Northern Alpine region and Ticino in the Southern Alps) a comparison with observed historical fire data is shown. In Valais, a region in the Western Alps with a generally low fire hazard, a weak trend toward more forest fires and more area burned could be found. The correlation between calculated indices and observed fires was quite low in this region. In Bavaria (Northern Alps) this correlation was higher, but while the trend of forest fires in Bavaria was decreasing in terms of number and burned area, the meteorological fire danger in contrast increased. Reasons for this contrasting trend may be related to altered anthropogenic factors such as less military activities, technical progress, and higher awareness. The correlation between indices and forest fires south of the Alps (Ticino) was considerably lower because here most forest fires occurred in winter when the meteorological fire danger is usually lower than in summer. In this region a positive trend in meteorological fire danger over recent decades was also counterbalanced by decreasing anthropogenic ignitions.

Mots-clés
 Alps, Climate change, Fire statistics, Forest fire, danger, Percentile analysis, Extreme values statistics

Organismes / Contact

Authors / Auteurs :

WASTL C., Chair of Ecoclimatology, Technische Universität München, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany

SCHUNK C., Chair of Ecoclimatology, Technische Universität München, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany

LEUCHNER M., Chair of Ecoclimatology, Technische Universität München, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany

PEZZATTI G.B., WSL, Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Insubric Ecosystems Research Group, Via Belsoggiorno 22, CH-6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland

MENZEL A., Chair of Ecoclimatology, Technische Universität München, Hans-Carl-von-Carlowitz-Platz 2, D-85354 Freising, Germany

rattaché au projet : European Union through the Alpine Space ALPFFIRS project (no. 15-2-3-IT).


(1) - Paramètre(s) atmosphérique(s) modifié(s)
(2) - Elément(s) du milieu impacté(s)
(3) - Type(s) d'aléa impacté(s)
(3) - Sous-type(s) d'aléa
températures & précipitations   Feux de forêts  

Pays / Zone
Massif / Secteur
Site(s) d'étude
Exposition
Altitude
Période(s) d'observation
Alps Alps       1951-2010

(1) - Modifications des paramètres atmosphériques
Reconstitutions
 
Observations

In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) reported an observed increase in global mean temperature of about 0.7 ◦C over the last 100 years. Numerous general circulation models (GCMs) predict an amplification of this trend up to 0.8–3.5 ◦C by 2100 AD, depending on the emission scenario (IPCC, 2007).

The four regions under consideration were specified as: Western Alps (WA, 3 stations), Northern Alps (NA, 8 stations), inner Alpine area (IA, 6 stations) and Southern Alps (SA, 8 stations; see Fig. 1).

Temperature :

The four regions were characterized by different temperature regimes, with annual mean temperature ranging from 6.6 ◦C (for the climate normal period 1971–2000) in the inner Alpine region (IA) to 10.5 ◦C in the Southern Alps (SA). The strong differences can partly be attributed to the high altitudes of the stations in the inner Alpine area.

Because maximum temperatures are essential in assessing forest fire danger we also included average daily maximum temperatures. The differences between regions were not as large (between 1.3 ◦C and 1.6 ◦C) as for the mean temperatures. This confirms the theory of inhomogeneous station series, because urbanization primarily influences night temperatures and has a relatively low effect on maximum temperatures. Nonetheless, the strongest warming for this parameter also occurred from the late 1970s onwards.

Precipitation :

The mean regional annual precipitation sum differed between 768 mm (averaged over 1971–2010) in the driest region (WA) and 1324 mm in the Southern Alps. The station with the highest annual accumulated precipitation was Locarno (1800 mm) on the southern slopes of the Swiss Alps, and the lowest was Sion (580 mm) located in a deep valley in the Western Alps.

The seasonal precipitation distribution differed between the Alpine regions. While the greatest precipitation north of the Alps usually occurred in summer (convection), autumn and winter were the seasons with highest precipitation amounts south of the Alps.

En 2007, la commission intergouvernementale sur le changement climatique (IPCC, 2007) a signalé une augmentation des températures moyennes d’environ 0.7°C sur les 100 dernières années. De nombreux modèles de circulation générale (GCMs) ont prédit une augmentation de cette tendance, qui se caractériserait, en fonction des scénarios utilisées, par une augmentation des températures moyennes de 0.8 à 3.5°C d’ici 2100.

Les 4 régions étudiées dans cette étude sont les suivantes : Les Alpes de l’Ouest (WA, 3 stations de mesure), les Alpes du Nord (NA, 8 stations), les Alpes intérieures (IA, 6 stations) et les Alpes du Sud (SA, 8 stations).

Températures :

Les 4 régions d’études sont caractérisées par des régimes de températures différents, avec des moyennes annuelles de températures allant de 6.6°C (pour la période 1971-2000) dans la région des Alpes intérieures (IA) à 10.5°C dans les Alpes du Sud (SA). La différence importante de température moyenne annuelle entre ces régions peut être, en partie, attribuée à la haute altitude des stations de mesures de la zone des Alpes intérieures.

Etant donné que la prise en compte des températures maximum est essentielle pour l’analyse du danger relatif aux feux de forêts, nous avons également inclus à cette étude la moyenne des températures maximum journalières. La différence observée entre les régions (entre 1.3 et 1.6°C) n’est pas aussi importante que celle observée pour les températures moyennes annuelles. Cela confirme le manque d’homogénéité des stations de mesure, l’urbanisation influençant principalement l’amplitude des températures nocturnes, et très peu les températures maximum. Dans tous les cas, on observe le réchauffement le plus important à la fin des années 70.

Précipitations :

La moyenne annuelle régionale de la somme des précipitations varie entre 768mm (moyenne sur la période 1971-2010), dans la région la plus sèche (WA), et 1324 mm dans les Alpes du Sud. La station ou les précipitations annuelles les plus importantes ont été enregistrées est Locarno (1800mm), sur la face nord des Alpes Suisses, et celle ou les précipitations annuelles les plus faibles ont été enregistrées est Sion (580 mm), dans une vallée des Alpes de l’ouest.

La distribution saisonnière des précipitations varie également entre les différentes régions alpines. Alors que, dans le nord des Alpes, les plus importantes précipitations ont lieu en été, dans le sud des Alpes, on retrouve les quantités les plus importantes en automne et en hiver.

Modélisations
 
Hypothèses
 

Informations complémentaires (données utilisées, méthode, scénarios, etc.)



(2) - Effets du changement climatique sur le milieu naturel
Reconstitutions
 
Observations
 

 

Modélisations
 
Hypothèses
 

Sensibilité du milieu à des paramètres climatiques
Informations complémentaires (données utilisées, méthode, scénarios, etc.)
 

 


(3) - Effets du changement climatique sur l'aléa
Reconstitutions
 
Observations

Most of the changes in forest fire danger occurred in the years after 1980 and related to a rapid increase of global temperatures. Outputs of various climate models predict an amplification of this trend in the coming decades and, if no rigorous rethinking occurs, this will continue into the far future.

The four regions under consideration were specified as: Western Alps (WA, 3 stations), Northern Alps (NA, 8 stations), inner Alpine area (IA, 6 stations) and Southern Alps (SA, 8 stations; see Fig. 1).

The slopes of the respective regression lines south and west of the Alps were clearly positive indicating an increase in the mean fire danger in these regions. The situation north of the Alps and especially in the inner Alpine valleys was much more difficult to describe with a high proportion of statistically non significant signals.
Generally the number of days with high index values increased across the Alps, but the slopes in the inner Alpine area and interestingly also in the Western Alps were very low. This implies that at the stations in the Western Alps the frequency of dangerous days has changed only slightly but these days have become more extreme. The stations south of the Alps again experienced the strongest changes.

Comparison with fire data

In Valais (Western Alps) the correlation between meteorological forest fire danger and observed fires was generally quite low, but the positive trend in the fire danger indices could also be found in the forest fire statistics.
In Bavaria (Northern Alps) this correlation was generally quite good, but in contrast to the meteorological forest fire danger, the observed fires and also the annual area burned have significantly decreased over the past 60 years. These low correlations underline the strong anthropogenic influences on forest fires in this pilot area.
The correlation between calculated indices and observed fires south of the Alps was considerably lower because here most of forest fires occurred in winter when the meteorological fire danger is usually low. A multiple linear regression revealed that in this region the positive trend in meteorological fire danger over the past decades was also counterbalanced by decreasing anthropogenic ignitions.

 

La plupart des changements relatifs aux risques de feux de forêts apparaît après les années 80 et apparaît comme conséquence de l’augmentation importante des températures. Les résultats des différents modèles climatiques mettent en avant une amplification de ces tendances dans les prochaines décennies.

Les 4 régions étudiées dans cette étude sont les suivantes : Les Alpes de l’Ouest (WA, 3 stations de mesure), les Alpes du Nord (NA, 8 stations), les Alpes intérieures (IA, 6 stations) et les Alpes du Sud (SA, 8 stations).

Les pentes des courbes de régression relatives aux alpes du sud et de l’ouest sont clairement positives et indiquent ainsi une augmentation du risque relatif aux feux de forêts dans ces régions. Le cas des Alpes du nord, et particulièrement dans les vallées des Alpes intérieures, a été beaucoup plus difficile à analyser, étant donné l’importante part de signaux statistiques non significatifs.
De manière générale, le nombre de jours, avec un indice de risque potentiel élevé, a augmenté dans les Alpes. Cependant, les pentes associées aux courbes de régression des Alpes intérieures et, de manière surprenante, à celles des Alpes de l’ouest sont apparues très basses. Ces observations sous entendent que, pour les stations des Alpes de l’ouest, la fréquence d’apparition de jours à risques n’a que très peu évoluée, mais que pour les jours à risque, le danger associé a augmenté fortement. Une fois de plus, les changements les plus importants ont été enregistrés dans les Alpes du sud.

Comparaison avec les données relatives aux feux de forêts :

Dans le Valais (WA), la corrélation entre le danger météorologique potentiel relatif aux feux de forêts et les feux de forêts observés est assez faible. Cependant, la tendance positive des indices de danger relatifs aux feux de forêts se retrouve également dans les statistiques associées à l’apparition de feux de forêts.
En Bavière (NA), cette corrélation est assez bonne. Cependant, à l’inverse du danger météorologique potentiel relatif aux feux de forêts, les feux de forêts observés ainsi que la moyenne des surfaces annuelles brûlées, ont fortement diminués au cours des 60 dernières années. Ces corrélations faibles soulignent le rôle important des influences anthropiques sur le déclenchement des feux de forêts dans les zones d'étude.
Etant donné que, dans les Alpes du sud, la plupart des feux forêts ont lieu en hiver, lorsque le danger météorologique potentiel est bas, la corrélation entre les indices de danger et les feux observés est très faible.

Modélisations
 
Hypothèses
 

Paramètre de l'aléa
Sensibilité du paramètres de l'aléa à des paramètres climatiques
Informations complémentaires (données utilisées, méthode, scénarios, etc.)
 
 
 Notre analyse se base sur des observations météorologiques journalières enregistrées par 25 stations situées dans 6 pays alpins. Les stations sélectionnées se situent de manière plus ou moins uniformes le long de la chaîne alpine et représentent les différents climats existants dans ces régions au terrain varié. Les stations avec des données climatiques similaires ont été regroupées par régions. On obtient ainsi 4 régions : Alpes de l’Ouest, Alpes du Nord, Alpes intérieures et Alpes du Sud. Le danger météorologique potentiel relatif aux feux de forêts sur la période 1951-2010, a été analysé sur la base de différents indices de danger relatifs aux feux de forêts, calculés sur une base journalière.
Our analysis is based on daily meteorological observations from 25 long-term stations in six Alpine countries. The selected stations are distributed more or less uniformly over the whole Alpine area and represent the different climate regions in this complex terrain. Stations with similar climatological conditions were grouped into regions. These were: Western Alps, Northern Alps, inner Alpine area and Southern Alps. The meteorological forest fire danger in the time period 1951–2010 was assessed on the basis of different forest fire danger indices (FWI, Nesterov, Baumgartner, etc.) calculated on a daily basis.

(4) - Remarques générales
 

(5) - Syntèses et préconisations
 

Références citées :

Auer, I., Bohm, R., Jurkovic, A., Lipa, W., Orlik, A., Potzmann, R., Schoner, W., Ungersbock, M., Matulla, C., Briffa, K., Jones, P., Efthymiadis, D., Brunetti, M., Nanni, T., Maugeri, M., Mercalli, L., Mestre, O., Moisselin, J.M., Begert, M., Muller- Westermeier, G., Kveton, V., Bochnicek, O., Stastny, P., Lapin, M., Szalai, S., Szentimrey, T., Cegnar, T., Dolinar, M., Gajic-Capka, M., Zaninovic, K., Majstorovic, Z., Nieplova, 2007. HISTALP – historical instrumental climatological surface time series of the Greater Alpine Region. Int. J. Climatol. 27, 17–46.

Baumgartner, A., Klemmer, L., Raschke, E., Waldmann, G., 1967. Waldbrände in Bayern 1950 bis 1959. Mitteilungen Staatsforstverwaltung Bayerns, 36.

Beverly, J.L., Martell, D.L., 2005. Characterizing extreme fire and weather events in the Boreal Shield ecozone of Ontario. Agric. Forest Meteorol. 133, 5–16.

Bradshaw, L.S., Deeming, J.E., Burgan, R.E., Cohen, J.D., 1983. 1978 NFDRS: Technical Documentation. USDA Forestry Service-Technical Report, p. 39.

Chandler, C., Cheney, P., Thomas, P., Trabaud, L., Williams, D., 1983. Fire in Forestry – Forest Fire Behaviour and Effects.

John Wiley & Sons, New York, Chinchester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore. Coles, S., 2001. An Antroduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values, Springer Series in Statistics.

Springer, London. Conedera, M., Cesti, G., Pezzatti, G.B., Zumbrunnen, T., Spinedi, F., 2006. Lightning induced fires in the Alpine region: an increasing problem. Forest Ecol. Manage. 234 (Supp 1), 68–77.

Embrechts, P., Klüppelberg, C., Mikosch, T., 1997. Modelling Extremal Events for Insurance and Finance. Applications in Mathematics. Springer, Berlin.

Flannigan, M.D., Krawchuk, M.A., DeGroot, W.J., Wotton, B.M., Gowman, L.M., 2009. Implications of changing climate for global wildland fire. Int. J. Wildland Fire 18, 483–507.

Fox-Hughes, P., 2008. A fire danger climatology for Tasmania. Aust. Meteorol. Mag. 57, 109–120.

Gilleland, E., Katz, R., Young, G., 2010. extRemes:Extreme Value Toolkit. R Package Version 1.62., http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=extRemes.

IPCC, 2007. Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability: Contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Käse, H., 1969. Ein Vorschlag für eine Methode zur Bestimmung und Vorhersage der Waldbrandgefährdung mit Hilfe komplexer Kennziffern. Abhandlungen des Meteorologischen Dienstes der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik, 94.

Liu, Y.Q., Stanturf, J., Goodrick, S., 2010. Trends in global wildfire potential in a changing climate. Forest Ecol. Manage. 259, 685–697.

Moriondo, M., Good, P., Durao, R., Bindi, M., Ginnakopoulos, C., Corte-Real, J., 2006. Potential impact of climate change on fire risk in the Mediterranean area. Clim. Res. 31, 85–95.

Moritz, M.A., 1997. Analyzing extreme disturbance events: fire in Los Padres National Forest. Ecol. Appl. 7, 1252–1262.

Nesterov, V.G., 1949. Combustibility of the Forest and Methods for its Determination. USSR State Industry Press. Noble, I.R., Bary, G.A.V., Gill, A.M., 1980. McArthur’s fire-danger meters expressed as equations. Aust. J. Ecol. 5, 201–203.

Pezzatti, G.B., Reinhard, M., Conedera, M., 2010. Swissfire: die neue schweizerische Waldbranddatenbank|Swissfire: the new Swiss forest fire database. Swiss Forest. J. 161 (11), 465–469.

Pezzatti, G.B., Zumbrunnen, T., Bürgi, M., Ambrosetti, P., Conedera, M. Fire regime shifts as a consequence of fire policy and socio-economic development: An analysis based on the change point approach. Forest Policy Econ., in press. Rebetez, M., 1999. Twentieth century trends in drought in southern Switzerland. Geophys. Res. Lett. 26, 541–557.

Reineking, B., Weibel, P., Conedera, M., Bugmann, H., 2010. Environmental determinants of lightning- v. human-induced forest fire ignitions differ in a temperate mountain region of Switzerland. Int. J. Wildland Fire 19, 541–557.

Reinhard, M., Rebetez, M., Schlaepfer, R., 2005. Recent climate change: rethinking drought in the context of forest fire research in Ticino, South of Switzerland. Theor. Appl. Climatol. 82, 17–25.

Ruosteenoja, K., Tuomenvirta, H., Jylha, K., 2007. GCM-based regional temperature and precipitation change estimates for Europe under four SRES scenarios applying a super-ensemble pattern-scaling method. Clim. Change 81, 193–208.

Schmidli, J., Frei, C., 2005. Trends of heavy precipitation and wet and dry spells in Switzerland during the 20th century. Int. J. Climatol. 25, 753–771.

Schwarb, M., 2000. The Alpine precipitation Climate. Dissertation, ETH Zürich.

Skinner, W.R., Flannigan, M.D., Stocks, B.J., Martell, D.L., Wotton, B.M., Todd, J.B., Mason, J.A., Logan, K.A., Bosch, E.M., 2002. A 500 hPa synoptic wildland fire climatology for large Canadian forst fires, 1959–1996. Theor. Appl. Climatol. 71, 157–169.

Stephenson, A., 2010. Ismev: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values. R Package Version 1.35., http://CRAN.R-project.org/package=ismev.

Stephenson, A., Gilleland, E., 2006. Software for the analysis of extreme events: the current state and future directions. Extremes 8, 87–109.

Van Wagner, C.E., 1987. Development and Structure of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System. No. Canadian Forestry Service Forestry Technical Report 35, Ottawa.

Veblen, T.T., Baker, W.L., Montenegro, G., Swetnam, T.W., 2003. Fire and climatic change in temperate ecosystems of the western Americas. Ecol. Stud. 160, 1–444.

Viegas, D.X., Bovio, G., Ferreira, A., Nosenzo, A., So, l.B., 1999. Comparative study of various methods of fire danger evaluation in Southern Europe. Int. J. Wildland Fire 9, 235–246.

Weibel, P., 2009. Modelling and Assessing Fire Regimes in Mountain Forests of Switzerland. Swiss Feder. Institute of Technology.

Westerling, A., Turner, M., Smithwick, E., Romme, W., Ryan, M., 2011. Continued warming could transform Greater Yellowstone fire regimes by mid-21st century. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108, 13165–13170.

Whitlock, C., Schafer, S., Marlon, J., 2003. The role of climate and vegetation change in shaping past and future fire regimes in the northwestern US and the implications for ecosystem management. Forest Ecol. Manage. 178, 5–21.

Wotton, B.M., Martell, D.L., Logan, K.A., 2003. Climate change and people-caused forest fire occurence in Ontario. Clim. Change 60, 275–295.

Zhao, F., Shu, L., Tiao, X., Wang, M., 2009. Change trends of forest fire danger in Yunnan Province in 1957–2007. Shengtaixue Zazhi 28, 2333–2338.

Zumbrunnen, T., Bugmann, H., Conedera, M., Burgi, M., 2009. Linking forest fire regimes and climate – a historical analysis in a dry inner Alpine valley. Ecosystems 12, 73–86.


Europe

Alpine Space ClimChAlp ONERC
ONERC
Rhône-Alpes PARN

Portail Alpes-Climat-Risques   |   PARN 2007–2017   |  
Mentions légales